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11.10: Chapter Summary

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    39221
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    Morphic is a graphical framework in which graphical interface elements can be dynamically composed.

    • You can convert an object into a morph and display that morph on the screen by sending it the messages asMorph openInWorld.
    • You can manipulate a morph by blue-clicking on it and using the handles that appear. (Handles have help balloons that explain what they do.)
    • You can compose morphs by embedding one onto another, either by drag and drop or by sending the message addMorph:.
    • You can subclass an existing morph class and redefine key methods, like initialize and drawOn:.
    • You can control how a morph reacts to mouse and keyboard events by redefining the methods handlesMouseDown:, handlesMouseOver:, etc.
    • You can animate a morph by defining the methods step (what to do) and stepTime (the number of milliseconds between steps).
    • Various pre-defined morphs, like PopUpMenu and FillInTheBlank, are available for interacting with users.

    This page titled 11.10: Chapter Summary is shared under a CC BY-SA 3.0 license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Andrew P. Black, Stéphane Ducasse, Oscar Nierstrasz, Damien Pollet via source content that was edited to the style and standards of the LibreTexts platform; a detailed edit history is available upon request.