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1.3.2: The Processor - Bus

  • Page ID
    46353
  • Control Bus

    In computer architecture, a control bus is part of the system bus, used by CPUs for communicating with other devices within the computer. While the address bus carries the information about the device with which the CPU is communicating and the data bus carries the actual data being processed, the control bus carries commands from the CPU and returns status signals from the devices. For example, if the data is being read or written to the device the appropriate line (read or write) will be active (logic one).

    Address bus

    An address bus is a bus that is used to specify a physical address. When a processor or DMA-enabled device needs to read or write to a memory location, it specifies that memory location on the address bus (the value to be read or written is sent on the data bus). The width of the address bus determines the amount of memory a system can address. For example, a system with a 32-bit address bus can address 232 (4,294,967,296) memory locations. If each memory location holds one byte, the addressable memory space is 4 GiB.

    Data / Memory Bus

    The memory bus is the computer bus which connects the main memory to the memory controller in computer systems. Originally, general-purpose buses like VMEbus and the S-100 bus were used, but to reduce latency, modern memory buses are designed to connect directly to DRAM chips, and thus are designed by chip standards bodies such as JEDEC. Examples are the various generations of SDRAM, and serial point-to-point buses like SLDRAM and RDRAM. An exception is the Fully Buffered DIMM which, despite being carefully designed to minimize the effect, has been criticized for its higher latency.

    Adapted from:
    "Bus (computing)" by Multiple ContributorsWikipedia is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0
    "Memory bus" by Multiple ContributorsWikipedia is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0
    "Control bus" by Multiple ContributorsWikipedia is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

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