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Engineering LibreTexts

7.3: Locality

  • Page ID
    40748
  • When a program reads a byte for the first time, the cache usually loads a “block” or “line” of data that includes the requested byte and some of its neighbors. If the program goes on to read one of the neighbors, it will already be in cache.

    As an example, suppose the block size is 64 B; you read a string with length 64, and the first byte of the string happens to fall at the beginning of a block. When you load the first byte, you incur a miss penalty, but after that the rest of the string will be in cache. After reading the whole string, the hit rate will be 63/64, about 98%. If the string spans two blocks, you would incur 2 miss penalties. But even then the hit rate would be 62/64, or almost 97%. If you then read the same string again, the hit rate would be 100%.

    On the other hand, if the program jumps around unpredictably, reading data from scattered locations in memory, and seldom accessing the same location twice, cache performance would be poor.

    The tendency of a program to use the same data more than once is called “temporal locality”. The tendency to use data in nearby locations is called “spatial locality”. Fortunately, many programs naturally display both kinds of locality:

    • Most programs contain blocks of code with no jumps or branches. Within these blocks, instructions run sequentially, so the access pattern has spatial locality.
    • In a loop, programs execute the same instructions many times, so the access pattern has temporal locality.
    • The result of one instruction is often used immediately as an operand of the next instruction, so the data access pattern has temporal locality.
    • When a program executes a function, its parameters and local variables are stored together on the stack; accessing these values has spatial locality.
    • One of the most common processing patterns is to read or write the elements of an array sequentially; this pattern also has spatial locality.

    The next section explores the relationship between a program’s access pattern and cache performance.

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