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Engineering LibreTexts

5.4: Setting Up the Buttons

  • Page ID
    14695
  • def main():
        global FPSCLOCK, DISPLAYSURF, BASICFONT, RESET_SURF, RESET_RECT, NEW_SURF, NEW_RECT, SOLVE_SURF, SOLVE_RECT
    
        pygame.init()
        FPSCLOCK = pygame.time.Clock()
        DISPLAYSURF = pygame.display.set_mode((WINDOWWIDTH, WINDOWHEIGHT))
        pygame.display.set_caption('Slide Puzzle')
        BASICFONT = pygame.font.Font('freesansbold.ttf', BASICFONTSIZE)
    
        # Store the option buttons and their rectangles in OPTIONS.
        RESET_SURF, RESET_RECT = makeText('Reset',    TEXTCOLOR, TILECOLOR, WINDOWWIDTH - 120, WINDOWHEIGHT - 90)
        NEW_SURF,   NEW_RECT   = makeText('New Game', TEXTCOLOR, TILECOLOR, WINDOWWIDTH - 120, WINDOWHEIGHT - 60)
        SOLVE_SURF, SOLVE_RECT = makeText('Solve',    TEXTCOLOR, TILECOLOR, WINDOWWIDTH - 120, WINDOWHEIGHT - 30)
    
        mainBoard, solutionSeq = generateNewPuzzle(80)
        SOLVEDBOARD = getStartingBoard() # a solved board is the same as the board in a start state.
    

    Just like in the last chapter, the functions called from the main() function calls will be explained later in the chapter. For now, you just need to know what they do and what values they return. You don’t need to know how they work.

    The first part of the main() function will handle creating the window, Clock object, and Font object. The makeText() function is defined later in the program, but for now you just need to know that it returns a pygame.Surface object and pygame.Rect object which can be used to make clickable buttons. The Slide Puzzle game will have three buttons: a "Reset" button that will undo any moves the player has made, a "New" button that will create a new slide puzzle, and a "Solve" button that will solve the puzzle for the player.

    We will need to have two board data structures for this program. One board will represent the current game state. The other board will have its tiles in the "solved" state, meaning that all the tiles are lined up in order. When the current game state’s board is exactly the same as the solved board, then we know the player has won. (We won’t ever change this second one. It’ll just be there to compare the current game state board to.)

    The generateNewPuzzle() will create a board data structure that started off in the ordered, solved state and then had 80 random slide moves performed on it (because we passed the integer 80 to it. If we want the board to be even more jumbled, then we can pass a larger integer to it). This will make the board into a randomly jumbled state that the player will have to solve (which will be stored in a variable named mainBoard). The generateNewBoard() also returns a list of all the random moves that were performed on it (which will be stored in a variable named solutionSeq).

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