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12.1: Theory Overview

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    The Superposition Theorem can be used to analyze multi-source AC linear bilateral networks. Each source is considered in turn, with the remaining sources replaced by their internal impedance, and appropriate series-parallel analysis techniques employed. The resulting signals are then summed to produce the combined output signal. To see this process more clearly, the exercise will utilize two sources operating at different frequencies. Note that as each source has a different frequency, the inductor and capacitor appear as different reactances to the two sources.


    This page titled 12.1: Theory Overview is shared under a CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by James M. Fiore via source content that was edited to the style and standards of the LibreTexts platform; a detailed edit history is available upon request.