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3.4.1: Theory Overview

  • Page ID
    76793
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    A series circuit is defined by a single loop in which all components are arranged in daisy-chain fashion. The current is the same at all points in the loop and may be found by dividing the total voltage source by the total resistance. The voltage drops across any resistor may then be found by multiplying that current by the resistor value. Consequently, the voltage drops in a series circuit are directly proportional to the resistance. An alternate technique to find the voltage is the voltage divider rule. This states that the voltage across any resistor (or combination of resistors) is equal to the total voltage source times the ratio of the resistance of interest to the total resistance.


    This page titled 3.4.1: Theory Overview is shared under a CC BY-NC-SA license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by James M. Fiore.

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