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16.2.2: Wildcard in LIKE clause

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    92216
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    The LIKE keyword selects rows containing fields that match specified portions of character strings. LIKE is used with char, varchar, text, datetime and smalldatetime data. A wildcard allows the user to match fields that contain certain letters. For example, the wildcard province = ‘N%’ would give all provinces that start with the letter ‘N’. Table 16.3 shows four ways to specify wildcards in the SELECT statement in regular express format.

    %

    Any string of zero or more characters

    _

    Any single character

    [ ]

    Any single character within the specified range (e.g., [a-f]) or set (e.g., [abcdef])

    [^]

    Any single character not within the specified range (e.g., [^a – f]) or set (e.g., [^abcdef])
    Figure \(\PageIndex{1}\): How to specify wildcards in the SELECT statement. (Copyright; author via source)

    In example #1, LIKE ‘Mc%’ searches for all last names that begin with the letters “Mc” (e.g., McBadden).

    SELECT LastName
    FROM Employees
    WHERE LastName LIKE ‘Mc%’

    For example #2: LIKE ‘%inger’ searches for all last names that end with the letters “inger” (e.g., Ringer, Stringer).

    SELECT LastName
    FROM Employees
    WHERE LastName LIKE ‘%inger’

    In, example #3: LIKE ‘%en%’ searches for all last names that have the letters “en” (e.g., Bennett, Green, McBadden).

    SELECT LastName
    FROM Employees
    WHERE LastName LIKE ‘%en%’

    16.2.2: Wildcard in LIKE clause is shared under a not declared license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by LibreTexts.

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