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5.3: Mutual Exclusion

  • Page ID
    47658
  • Mutual Exclusion Explained

    The problem which mutual exclusion addresses is a problem of resource sharing: how can a software system control multiple processes' access to a shared resource, when each process needs exclusive control of that resource while doing its work? The mutual-exclusion solution to this makes the shared resource available only while the process is in a specific code segment called the critical section. It controls access to the shared resource by controlling each mutual execution of that part of its program where the resource would be used.

    A successful solution to this problem must have at least these two properties:

    • It must implement mutual exclusion: only one process can be in the critical section at a time.
    • It must be free of deadlocks: if processes are trying to enter the critical section, one of them must eventually be able to do so successfully, provided no process stays in the critical section permanently.

    Hardware solutions

    On single-processor systems, the simplest solution to achieve mutual exclusion is to disable interrupts when a process is in a critical section. This will prevent any interrupt service routines (such as the system timer, I/O interrupt request, etc) from running (effectively preventing a process from being interrupted). Although this solution is effective, it leads to many problems. If a critical section is long, then the system clock will drift every time a critical section is executed because the timer interrupt (which keeps the system clock in sync) is no longer serviced, so tracking time is impossible during the critical section. Also, if a process halts during its critical section, control will never be returned to another process, effectively halting the entire system. A more elegant method for achieving mutual exclusion is the busy-wait.

    Busy-waiting is effective for both single-processor and multiprocessor systems. The use of shared memory and an atomic (remember - we talked about atomic) test-and-set instruction provide the mutual exclusion. A process can test-and-set on a variable in a section of shared memory, and since the operation is atomic, only one process can set the flag at a time. Any process that is unsuccessful in setting the flag (it is unsuccessful because the process can NOT gain access to the variable until the other process releases it) can either go on to do other tasks and try again later, release the processor to another process and try again later, or continue to loop while checking the flag until it is successful in acquiring it. Preemption is still possible, so this method allows the system to continue to function—even if a process halts while holding the lock.

    Software solutions

    In addition to hardware-supported solutions, some software solutions exist that use busy waiting to achieve mutual exclusion. 

    It is often preferable to use synchronization facilities provided by an operating system's multithreading library, which will take advantage of hardware solutions if possible but will use software solutions if no hardware solutions exist. For example, when the operating system's lock library is used and a thread tries to acquire an already acquired lock, the operating system could suspend the thread using a context switch and swap it out with another thread that is ready to be run, or could put that processor into a low power state if there is no other thread that can be run

     Adapted from:
    "Mutual exclusion" by Multiple ContributorsWikipedia is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

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