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10.1: The Question

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    48923
  • What is the purpose of multiprocessing

    In computer science, multiprocessor scheduling is an optimization problem involving the scheduling of computational tasks in a multiprocessor environment. The problem statement is: "Given a set J of jobs where job ji has length li and a number of processors m, what is the minimum possible time required to schedule all jobs in J on m processors such that none overlap?". The problem is often called the minimum makespan problem: the makespan of a schedule is defined as the time it takes the system to complete all processes, and the goal is to find a schedule that minimizes the makespan. The problem has many variants.

    Approaches to Multiple-Processor Scheduling

    Asymmetric multiprocessing

    An asymmetric multiprocessing (AMP or ASMP) system is a multiprocessor computer system where not all of the multiple interconnected central processing units (CPUs) are treated equally. For example, a system might allow (either at the hardware or operating system level) only one CPU to execute operating system code or might allow only one CPU to perform I/O operations. Other AMP systems might allow any CPU to execute operating system code and perform I/O operations, so that they were symmetric with regard to processor roles, but attached some or all peripherals to particular CPUs, so that they were asymmetric with respect to the peripheral attachment.

     

    Asmp_2.gif
    Figure \(\PageIndex{1}\): Asymmetric multiprocessing. ("Asmp 2.gif" by G7aWikimedia Commons is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0)

    Asymmetric multiprocessing was the only method for handling multiple CPUs before symmetric multiprocessing (SMP) was available. It has also been used to provide less expensive options on systems where SMP was available.

    Symmetric multiprocessing

    Symmetric multiprocessing (SMP) involves a multiprocessor computer hardware and software architecture where two or more identical processors are connected to a single, shared main memory, have full access to all input and output devices, and are controlled by a single operating system instance that treats all processors equally, reserving none for special purposes. Most multiprocessor systems today use an SMP architecture. In the case of multi-core processors, the SMP architecture applies to the cores, treating them as separate processors.

    Professor John D. Kubiatowicz considers traditionally SMP systems to contain processors without caches. Culler and Pal-Singh in their 1998 book "Parallel Computer Architecture: A Hardware/Software Approach" mention: "The term SMP is widely used but causes a bit of confusion.  The more precise description of what is intended by SMP is a shared memory multiprocessor where the cost of accessing a memory location is the same for all processors; that is, it has uniform access costs when the access actually is to memory. If the location is cached, the access will be faster, but cache access times and memory access times are the same on all processors."

    SMP_-_Symmetric_Multiprocessor_System.svg.png
    Figure \(\PageIndex{1}\): SMP - Symmetric Multiprocessor System. ("SMP - Symmetric Multiprocessor System" by Ferry24.MilanWikimedia Commons is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0)

    SMP systems are tightly coupled multiprocessor systems with a pool of homogeneous processors running independently of each other. Each processor, executing different programs and working on different sets of data, has the capability of sharing common resources (memory, I/O device, interrupt system and so on) that are connected using a system bus or a crossbar.

    Adapted from:
    "Asymmetric multiprocessing" by Multiple ContributorsWikipedia is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0
    "Symmetric multiprocessing" by Multiple ContributorsWikipedia is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

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