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2.1.1: Energy Conservation

  • Page ID
    84571
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    Let’s start with the following statement: energy... ...can be converted in form, but not created or destroyed. Very important! Energy cannot ”pop out of nothing” (with the exception of Harry Potter movies), it cannot disappear without a trace. This expresses a law, known as the Energy Conservation Law, one of the most fundamental laws of physics. Energy may be passed from one object to another, but the sum of energies in all objects under consideration remains unchanged. In other words, some objects may become “energized”, while some other ”de-energized”, with the total energy unchanged in the process. Also, as was argued above, energy from one object must not necessarily be transferred to “another object”, it may be “radiated out”, i.e., it may leave the first object in the form of radiation and then travel through empty space. However, the energy of the radiation “sent out” must be exactly equal to the amount of energy lost by the object from which the radiation is emitted.


    2.1.1: Energy Conservation is shared under a CC BY 1.3 license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Tom Giebultowicz.

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