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9: The Map interface

  • Page ID
    12784
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    In the next few exercises, I present several implementations of the Map interface. One of them is based on a hash table, which is arguably the most magical data structure ever invented. Another, which is similar to TreeMap, is not quite as magical, but it has the added capability that it can iterate the elements in order.

    You will have a chance to implement these data structures, and then we will analyze their performance.

    But before we can explain hash tables, we’ll start with a simple implementation of a Map using a List of key-value pairs.


    This page titled 9: The Map interface is shared under a CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Allen B. Downey (Green Tea Press) .

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