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Computer Science from the Bottom Up (Wienand)

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    77114
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    In a nutshell, what you are reading is intended to be a shop class for computer science. Young computer science students are taught to "drive" the computer; but where do you go to learn what is under the hood? Trying to understand the operating system is unfortunately not as easy as just opening the bonnet. The current Linux kernel runs into the millions of lines of code, add to that the other critical parts of a modern operating system (the compiler, assembler and system libraries) and your code base becomes unimaginable. Further still, add a University level operating systems course (or four), some good reference manuals, two or three years of C experience and, just maybe, you might be able to figure out where to start looking to make sense of it all.


    This page titled Computer Science from the Bottom Up (Wienand) is shared under a CC BY-SA 3.0 license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Ian Wienand via source content that was edited to the style and standards of the LibreTexts platform; a detailed edit history is available upon request.