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2: Binary and Number Representation

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    • 2.1: Binary — the basis of computing
      Binary is a base-2 number system that uses two mutually exclusive states to represent information. A binary number is made up of elements called bits where each bit can be in one of the two possible states. Generally, we represent them with the numerals 1 and 0. We also talk about them being true and false. Electrically, the two states might be represented by high and low voltages or some form of switch turned on or off.
    • 2.2: Types and Number Representation
      C is the common languge of the systems programming world. Every operating system and its associated system libraries in common use is written in C, and every system provides a C compiler. To stop the language diverging across each of these systems where each would be sure to make numerous incompatible changes, a strict standard has been written for the language.


    This page titled 2: Binary and Number Representation is shared under a CC BY-SA 3.0 license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Ian Wienand via source content that was edited to the style and standards of the LibreTexts platform; a detailed edit history is available upon request.

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