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4: Mathematical Data Types

  • Page ID
    48250
    • Eric Lehman, F. Thomson Leighton, & Alberty R. Meyer
    • Google and Massachusetts Institute of Technology via MIT OpenCourseWare

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    We have assumed that you’ve already been introduced to the concepts of sets, sequences, and functions, and we’ve used them informally several times in previous sections. In this chapter, we’ll now take a more careful look at these mathematical data types. We’ll quickly review the basic definitions, add a few more such as “images” and “inverse images” that may not be familiar, and end the chapter with some methods for comparing the sizes of sets.


    This page titled 4: Mathematical Data Types is shared under a CC BY-NC-SA license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Eric Lehman, F. Thomson Leighton, & Alberty R. Meyer (MIT OpenCourseWare) .

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