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6.2: Deadlock Detection and Prevention

  • Page ID
    48016
  • Deadlock Handling

    Most current operating systems cannot prevent deadlocks. When a deadlock occurs, different operating systems respond to them in different non-standard manners. Most approaches work by preventing one of the four Coffman conditions from occurring, especially the fourth one. Major approaches are as follows.

    Ignoring deadlock

    In this approach, it is assumed that a deadlock will never occur. This is also an application of the Ostrich algorithm. This approach was initially used by MINIX and UNIX. This is used when the time intervals between occurrences of deadlocks are large and the data loss incurred each time is tolerable.

    Ignoring deadlocks can be safely done if deadlocks are formally proven to never occur.

    Detection

    Under the deadlock detection, deadlocks are allowed to occur. Then the state of the system is examined to detect that a deadlock has occurred and subsequently it is corrected. An algorithm is employed that tracks resource allocation and process states, it rolls back and restarts one or more of the processes in order to remove the detected deadlock. Detecting a deadlock that has already occurred is easily possible since the resources that each process has locked and/or currently requested are known to the resource scheduler of the operating system.

    After a deadlock is detected, it can be corrected by using one of the following methods

    1. Process termination: one or more processes involved in the deadlock may be aborted. One could choose to abort all competing processes involved in the deadlock. This ensures that deadlock is resolved with certainty and speed. But the expense is high as partial computations will be lost. Or, one could choose to abort one process at a time until the deadlock is resolved. This approach has high overhead because after each abort an algorithm must determine whether the system is still in deadlock. Several factors must be considered while choosing a candidate for termination, such as priority and age of the process.
    2. Resource preemption: resources allocated to various processes may be successively preempted and allocated to other processes until the deadlock is broken.
    Two processes concurring for two resources. A deadlock occurs when the first process locks the first resource at the same time as the second process locks the second resource. The deadlock can be resolved by cancelling and restarting the first process.
    Figure \(\PageIndex{1}\): Two processes concurring for two resources. A deadlock occurs when the first process locks the first resource at the same time as the second process locks the second resource. The deadlock can be resolved by cancelling and restarting the first process. 
    ("Two Processes - Two Resources" by Wikimedia Commons is licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0)

    In the above image - there are 2 resources. Initially only one process is using both resources. When a second process attempts to access one of the resources, it is temporarily blocked, until the resource is released by the other process.. When 2 processes each have control of one resource there is a deadlock, as the process can not gain access to the other process it need to continue to process. Eventually, the one process is canceled, allowing the system to block the other resource and allow one of the processes to complete, which then frees up both resources for the other process.

    Prevention

    Deadlock prevention works by preventing one of the four Coffman conditions from occurring.

    • Removing the mutual exclusion condition means that no process will have exclusive access to a resource. This proves impossible for resources that cannot be spooled. But even with spooled resources, the deadlock could still occur. Algorithms that avoid mutual exclusion are called non-blocking synchronization algorithms.
    • The hold and wait or resource holding conditions may be removed by requiring processes to request all the resources they will need before starting up (or before embarking upon a particular set of operations). This advance knowledge is frequently difficult to satisfy and, in any case, is an inefficient use of resources. Another way is to require processes to request resources only when it has none; First they must release all their currently held resources before requesting all the resources they will need from scratch. This too is often impractical. It is so because resources may be allocated and remain unused for long periods. Also, a process requiring a popular resource may have to wait indefinitely, as such a resource may always be allocated to some process, resulting in resource starvation. 
    • The no preemption condition may also be difficult or impossible to avoid as a process has to be able to have a resource for a certain amount of time, or the processing outcome may be inconsistent or thrashing may occur. However, the inability to enforce preemption may interfere with a priority algorithm. Preemption of a "locked out" resource generally implies a rollback, and is to be avoided since it is very costly in overhead. Algorithms that allow preemption include lock-free and wait-free algorithms and optimistic concurrency control. If a process holding some resources and requests for some another resource(s) that cannot be immediately allocated to it, the condition may be removed by releasing all the currently being held resources of that process.
    • The final condition is the circular wait condition. Approaches that avoid circular waits include disabling interrupts during critical sections and using a hierarchy to determine a partial ordering of resources. If no obvious hierarchy exists, even the memory address of resources has been used to determine ordering and resources are requested in the increasing order of the enumeration.
    (A) Two processes concurring for one resource, following a first-come, first-served policy. (B) A deadlock occurs when both processes lock the resource simultaneously. (C) The deadlock can be resolved by breaking the symmetry of the locks. (D) The deadlock can be avoided by breaking the symmetry of the locking mechanism.

    Figure \(\PageIndex{1}\): (A) Two processes concurring for one resource, following a first-come, first-served policy. (B) A deadlock occurs when both processes lock the resource simultaneously. (C) The deadlock can be resolved by breaking the symmetry of the locks. (D) The deadlock can be avoided by breaking the symmetry of the locking mechanism. 
    ("Avoiding Deadlock" by Wikimedia Commons is licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0)

    In the above image notice the yellow line - if it is the same on both sides, a deadlock can develop (scenario A shows that one process gets there first...it is difficult to see in the gif - but that is why there is NOT a deadlock - first come - first serve). Watch - when the yellow lines, representing the locking mechanism, are different on each side then we have a method to break the deadlock and allow the left side process tom complete and freeing up the resource for the right and resource to complete. 

    Adapted from:
    "Deadlock" by Multiple ContributorsWikipedia is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

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