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6.4: Firewalls

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    84148
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    Firewalls

     

    Diagram of a network configuration with firewalls, a router, and a DMZ.
    Diagram of a network configuration with firewalls, a router, and a DMZ.

    Firewalls are another method that an organization can use for increasing security on its network. A firewall can exist as hardware or software, or both. A hardware firewall is a device that is connected to the network and filters the packets based on a set of rules. One example of these rules would be preventing packets entering the local network that come from unauthorized users. A software firewall runs on the operating system and intercepts packets as they arrive to a computer.

    A firewall protects all company servers and computers by stopping packets from outside the organization’s network that do not meet a strict set of criteria. A firewall may also be configured to restrict the flow of packets leaving the organization. This may be done to eliminate the possibility of employees watching YouTube videos or using Facebook from a company computer.

    A demilitarized zone (DMZ) implements multiple firewalls as part of network security configuration, creating one or more sections of their network that are partially secured. The DMZ typically contains resources that need broader access but still need to be secured.


    This page titled 6.4: Firewalls is shared under a CC BY-SA license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by David T. Bourgeois (Saylor Foundation) .

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